OCS Dr. George 250

King v Burwell Decision Affects You and Your Dr

 King v Burwell Decision Affects You and Your Dr

And It’s Not Good !!!

King v Burwell Decision Affects You and Your DrDr. Elaina George was a guest on Erskine Overnight and proved to be very “Tell It Like It Is”.

You may recognize Dr. George as a guest on many television shows such as Neil Cavuto on Fox.

Dr. George is working on a program to assist the Private Practice Doctor who chooses to maintain independence from the Big Federal Government System better known as Obamacare and the corrupt medical system that comes with it.

King v Burwell Decision Affects You and Your Dr

We at ObamacareSurvival.com are very much in line with her philosophy and believe she is onto something very big. 

We will be featuring her articles as released.

Check out Dr. George’s bio at the bottom of her article which we are proud to feature below:

What the King v Burwell Decision Means for Doctors and Patients

While reading the Supreme Court’s decision on King vs. Burwell, I realized that I was not surprised by the ruling. It fits the pattern that has developed over the last several years. The letter of the law has not applied to The Affordable Care Act, this was true when it was upheld as a tax instead of an abrogation of the Commerce clause, and now the ruling has massaged the meaning of subsidies that apply to state run exchanges to apply to everyone.

The other thing that has not changed is the fact that patients will continue to find access limited by rising out of pocket expenses in the form of rising deductibles, co-insurance and premiums that are expected to continue to increase further. We can continue to look forward to patients using emergency rooms as primary care centers because they can’t afford to see a physician and independent physicians closing their practices or becoming hospital employees further exacerbating the doctor shortage. The ruling does nothing to change the reality that having health insurance in the age of Obamacare does not equal access to quality healthcare.

Finally, the winners have been rewarded. When the stock value of health related companies such as corporate hospitals rise on the news of the decision, doctors and patients should take pause. The insurance companies and hospitals have clearly figured out that business as usual can continue. In fact, it will become business as usual on steroids.  Insurance companies will be empowered to further limit their physician panels, they will continue to decrease the medications that they will cover, they will continue to decrease what they cover as medically unnecessary and experimental to limit access to physician directed care while they increase their premiums increasing their profits in the bargain. Hospitals will continue to get larger taking over the market and setting prices without pressure from honest competition from independent physicians, ambulatory surgery centers, labs and radiology centers that would encourage cost control.

The King vs. Burwell decision has answered the question of who stands to gain in the age of Obamacare. Justice Roberts in his opinion said it best “Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them.”  With this decision medical insurance companies, hospitals and other pieces of the corporate healthcare delivery system now have the scale clearly tipped in their favor at the expense of doctors the patients – the mission has been accomplished.

King v Burwell Decision Affects You and Your Dr

DR. ELAINA GEORGE BIO:

Dr Elaina George is a Board Certified Otolaryngologist. She graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Biology. She received her Masters degree in Medical Microbiology from Long Island University, and received her medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. Dr George completed her residency at Manhattan, Eye Ear & Throat Hospital. Her training included general surgery at Lenox Hill Hospital, pediatric ENT at The NY-Presbyterian Hospital, and head and neck oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. She has published in several scientific journals and presented her research at national meetings. As a solo practitioner in private practice who is also a small business owner, she has a unique perspective on the problems of health care delivery, the true costs of healthcare and viable solutions. Dr George is a recipient of the Patients’ Choice Award in 2008 and 2009. She was recently honored with membership in The Leading Physicians of the World and Who’s Who Top Doctors Honors Edition.

 

 
High Blood Pressure Medication Side Effects

High Blood Pressure Medication Side Effects

High Blood Pressure Medication Side Effects

The Good The Bad And The Ugly

 High Blood Pressure Medication Side EffectsHigh Blood Pressure Medication Side Effects

 

Side Effects of High Blood Pressure Medications

Any medication can cause side effects, and high blood pressure (HBP) medications are no exception. However, many people do not have side effects from taking hypertension drugs, and often the side effects are mild. Still, it’s important to stay informed and work closely with your doctor to manage any side effects you may have. There’s no reason to “suffer in silence.” Today there are more medication options than ever for managing high blood pressure (hypertension).

This article lists the side effects that may be caused by each type of high blood pressure drug. First, here are four general warnings.

  1. Never stop taking medication without first talking to your doctor. In some cases, this can be very dangerous, causing a big spike in blood pressure.
  2. If you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant, talk to your doctor about the safest medication to use.ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) can cause harmful side effects for pregnant women and their developing babies.
  3. If you take insulin for diabetes, talk to your doctor. Changes in blood sugar can occur in people with diabetes taking diuretics or beta-blockers for high blood pressure.
  4. If you have problems with erections during sex, talk with your doctor. Some high blood pressure medications can cause this problem. Reducing the dose or changing to another type of medication may help. But high blood pressure itself can also cause erectile dysfunction.

As an informed patient, read about the type of medication you are taking and its possible side effects. You can find a full list on your medication insert. To get you started, here is an overview of the most common side effects of high blood pressure medications.

Medications Used to Treat High Blood Pressure

Diuretics

These high blood pressure medications flush extra water and sodium (salt) from your body. Diuretics may cause these side effects:

  • Extra urination. Extra water out means more time in the bathroom. Take these medications earlier in the day and when you’re not far away from a bathroom.
  • Erection problems in some men
  • Weakness, leg cramps, or fatigue. Diuretics may decrease the body’s levels of the mineral potassium, which can lead to these side effects. Certain potassium-sparing diuretics do not have this effect, however.
  • Intense and sudden foot pain, which is a symptom of gout; this is rare.

Beta-Blockers

Beta-blockers make your heart beat less forcefully and more slowly. These medications may cause side effects such as:

Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors

These high blood pressure medications block formation of a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow, so vessels relax. ACE inhibitors may cause these side effects:

  • A dry, hacking cough that doesn’t go away. If you have this side effect, the doctor may prescribe another type of medication.
  • Skin rash and a loss of taste are two other possible side effects of ACE inhibitors.

Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs)

These high blood pressure medications shield blood vessels from a hormone that causes blood vessels to narrow. This allows blood vessels to stay open. One of the more common side effects of ARBs is dizziness.

Calcium Channel Blockers (CCBs)

These high blood pressure medications keep calcium from entering heart muscle and blood vessel cells. Blood vessels can then relax. CCBs may cause these side effects:

Alpha-Blockers

Alpha-blockers reduce nerve impulses to blood vessels, allowing blood to flow more easily. These medications may cause:

  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness when standing up suddenly or getting up in the morning (from reduced blood pressure)
  • Fast heart rate

Alpha-2 Receptor Agonist

This high blood pressure medication decreases activity in the adrenaline-producing part of the nervous system. It may cause drowsiness or dizziness.

Alpha-Beta-Blockers

These high blood pressure medications reduce nerve impulses and also slow the heartbeat. Patients with severe high blood pressure often receive them by intravenous (IV) injection. But the doctor may also prescribe these medications for people who have congestive heart failure. Alpha-beta blockers may cause a drop in blood pressure when you stand up suddenly or first get up in the morning. This can cause dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness.

Central Agonists

These high blood pressure medications control nerve impulses, relaxing blood vessels.

Central agonists may cause:

  • Anemia
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness when standing up suddenly or getting up in the morning (from a drop in blood pressure)
  • Drowsiness
  • Dry mouth
  • Erection problems
  • Fever

Peripheral Adrenergic Inhibitors

This type of medication blocks neurotransmitters in the brain, so the message to constrict doesn’t reach smooth muscles. Used less often than other high blood pressure medications, these drugs can cause:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness when standing up suddenly or getting up in the morning (from reduced blood pressure)
  • Erection problems
  • Heartburn
  • Stuffy nose

If nightmares or insomnia persist, talk with your doctor about another HBP medication option.

Vasodilators

Vasodilators relax muscles in vessel walls, opening blood vessels and allowing blood to flow better. These medications may cause:

  • Excessive hair growth
  • Fluid retention
  • Headaches
  • Irregular or very rapid heartbeat (palpitations)
  • Joint aches and pains
  • Swelling around the eyes

Renin Inhibitor

This newer class of high blood pressure medication works by decreasing chemicals that tighten blood vessels. This medication may be used alone or in combination with another medication. Side effects may include:

If High Blood Pressure Drug Side Effects Bother You

Partner with your doctor. Ask if there are any take steps you can take to lessen medication side effects. For example, to lessen the effects of low blood pressure, it may help to avoid standing for a long time in the sun. In some cases, side effects such as fatigue or diarrhea may subside with time. In other cases, your doctor may change the dosage or prescribe another high blood pressure medication. A combination of medications sometimes works better than one medication alone by not only improving high blood pressure control but also by reducing side effects.

Also, when you first start a new high blood pressure medicine, be aware of rare allergic reactions. Call 911 right away if you develop hives, wheezing, vomiting, light-headedness, or swelling in your throat or face.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on April 12, 2015
 
Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication

Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication

Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication

How To Reduce Hypertension Naturally

Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication

Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication. How To Reduce Hypertension Naturally

Did You Know That U.S. Dept Health and Human Svs says 70 Million People in U.S. Have High Blood Pressure?

Hypertension Can Lead to Increased Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Western Medicine Admits That Adaption of Healthy Living Lifestyle Can Help To Lower Risk of Hypertension

But They Continue To Push Medications which sometimes Have Adverse Side Effects (BIG PHARMA $$$)

SEE: High Blood Pressure Medication Side Effects

10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication

By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Heart-Healthy Living

If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down.

Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you might avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication.

Here are 10 lifestyle changes you can make to lower your blood pressure and keep it down.

1. Lose extra pounds and watch your waistline

Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure.

Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure.

Besides shedding pounds, you generally should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure.

In general:

  • Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters).
  • Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters).

These numbers vary among ethnic groups. Ask your doctor about a healthy waist measurement for you.

2. Exercise regularly

Regular physical activity — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It’s important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again.

If you have slightly high blood pressure (prehypertension), exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

The best types of exercise for lowering blood pressure include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming or dancing. Strength training also can help reduce blood pressure. Talk to your doctor about developing an exercise program.

3. Eat a healthy diet

Eating a diet that is rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products and skimps on saturated fat and cholesterol can lower your blood pressure by up to 14 mm Hg. This eating plan is known as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.

It isn’t easy to change your eating habits, but with these tips, you can adopt a healthy diet:

  • Keep a food diary. Writing down what you eat, even for just a week, can shed surprising light on your true eating habits. Monitor what you eat, how much, when and why.
  • Consider boosting potassium. Potassium can lessen the effects of sodium on blood pressure. The best source of potassium is food, such as fruits and vegetables, rather than supplements. Talk to your doctor about the potassium level that’s best for you.
  • Be a smart shopper. Read food labels when you shop and stick to your healthy-eating plan when you’re dining out, too.

4. Reduce sodium in your diet

Even a small reduction in the sodium in your diet can reduce blood pressure by 2 to 8 mm Hg.

The effect of sodium intake on blood pressure varies among groups of people. In general, limit sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day or less. However, a lower sodium intake — 1,500 mg a day or less — is appropriate for people with greater salt sensitivity, including:

  • African-Americans
  • Anyone age 51 or older
  • Anyone diagnosed with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease

To decrease sodium in your diet, consider these tips:

  • Read food labels. If possible, choose low-sodium alternatives of the foods and beverages you normally buy.
  • Eat fewer processed foods. Only a small amount of sodium occurs naturally in foods. Most sodium is added during processing.
  • Don’t add salt. Just 1 level teaspoon of salt has 2,300 mg of sodium. Use herbs or spices to add flavor to your food.
  • Ease into it. If you don’t feel you can drastically reduce the sodium in your diet suddenly, cut back gradually. Your palate will adjust over time.

5. Limit the amount of alcohol you drink

Alcohol can be both good and bad for your health. In small amounts, it can potentially lower your blood pressure by 2 to 4 mm Hg.

But that protective effect is lost if you drink too much alcohol — generally more than one drink a day for women and for men older than age 65, or more than two a day for men age 65 and younger. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer, five ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor.

Drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol can actually raise blood pressure by several points. It can also reduce the effectiveness of blood pressure medications.

 Lower Blood Pressure Without Medication. How To Reduce Hypertension Naturally